client portal
  • Blue Forbes logo
  • AVVO 10.0
  • Top 100 Lawyers badge
  • Daily Business Review Newspaper
  • Legal Elite 2012 Badge
  • Top Rated Lawyers
  • The American Lawyer, Adrian Philip Thomas

Florida Probate Blog

Yearly Archives: 2014

Oral Agreement to Divide Inheritance

Written by on Jun 10, 2014| Posted in: Estate Litigation

ORAL AGREEMENTS SUFFICIENT UNDER FLORIDA LAW TO DIVIDE INHERITANCE FROM PARENTS Can siblings verbally agree to divide an inheritance prior to their parent’s or grandparent’s death?  The answer in Florida is Yes. In is widely accepted that in order for an agreement between parties to be legally binding and enforceable by a court or judge, at least four elements must be present:  (1) offer; (2) acceptance; (3) specific terms; and (4) consideration.  What is consideration? Consideration is simply a bargained for change in legal position between the parties.    One way to describe how the element of consideration is usually viewed by courts is to look at whether or not the parties making the promises to each other are either doing something that they are not under a legal obligation to do;  or refraining from doing something that they have a legal right to do (i.e., surrender or forebear from asserting […]

read more

Pretermitted Child: Paternity vs. Adoption

Written by on Apr 23, 2014| Posted in: Probate Litigation

The Florida legislature enacted a statute to protect the inheritance rights of children born after a decedent executed his or her Last Will & Testament.  The statute, known as a “Pretermitted Children” and found at Fla. Stat. §732.302, provides that “when a testator omits to provide by will for any of his or her children born or adopted after making the will and the child has not received a part of the testator’s property equivalent to a child’s part by way of advancement, the child shall receive a share of the estate equal in value to that which the child would have received it the testator had died intestate.”  The statute is predicated on the notion that parents intend for their children to inherit from them and that if a child was born after a parent executes a Will that it was probably an oversight not to execute a new […]

read more

Probate and Prenuptial Agreements

Written by on Mar 11, 2014| Posted in: Probate Litigation

What impact does a prenuptial agreement have upon title to the assets of a trust and the rights of trust beneficiaries? The importance of that question was highlighted by a recent Second District Court of Appeals case, Shakespeare v. Prince, 129 So.3d 412 (Fla. 2d DCA 2013). In Shakespeare, Mr. and Mrs. Shakespeare entered into a prenuptial agreement to maintain their assets separately. Mrs. Shakespeare, who had inherited a substantial fortune from her prior marriage, bought a home for the couple in Collier County. She subsequently created a trust and, waiving her homestead rights, transferred title of the home to the trust, making the home a trust asset. Mrs. Shakespeare’s trust provided that, upon her death, Mr. Shakespeare would receive only a life estate in the home; upon Mr. Shakespeare’s death, title to the home would pass to Mrs. Shakespeare’s son from her first marriage. This relatively straight-forward estate plan […]

read more

FLORIDA PRENEED GUARDIAN

Written by on Feb 20, 2014| Posted in: General

FLORIDA PRENEED GUARDIAN AS PART OF YOUR ESTATE PLAN Everyone’s estate plan is different.  Some people are content with having only a will and trust to manage and distribute their financial assets after death.  However, others find it appropriate to name a specific person to take care of their personal and financial well-being in the event that he or she becomes incapacitated during his or her lifetime.  The Florida legislature has provided such an avenue through the enactment of Fla. Stat. 744.3045, which is the law dealing with a preneed guardian. The statute states that “[p]roduction of the declaration (of a previously-designated preneed guardian) in a proceeding for incapacity shall constitute a rebuttable presumption that the preneed guardian is entitled to serve as guardian.  The court shall not be bound to appoint the preneed guardian if the preneed guardian is found to be unqualified to serve as guardian.”  What if […]

read more

How Long Does a Beneficiary Have to Challenge the Actions (or Inaction) of a Trustee?

Written by on Feb 10, 2014| Posted in: Trust Litigation

Typically, a trustee serves its accounting on beneficiaries which discloses all matters involving the trusts.  Under normal circumstances, a beneficiary then has four years from receipt of the accounting to bring an action for breach of fiduciary duty.  If an accounting is not provided to the beneficiaries, or when the accounting falls short of properly informing a beneficiary of what is happening with the trust assets, then the Statute of Limitations never begins to run.  If a beneficiary has actual knowledge of the matter not adequately disclosed in the accounting, and it can be proven by clear and convincing evidence that the beneficiary had actual knowledge, or if there has been a repudiation of the Trust by the Trustee and the beneficiary has actual or constructive knowledge of the repudiation, then the four-year statute of limitations will bar that claim, Fla. Stat. §736.1008(3)(a).  The fact that a Trustee has not […]

read more

Power of Appointment

Written by on Jan 2, 2014| Posted in: Probate Litigation

A Cautionary Tale from the First District Court of Appeal:  exercise a power of appointment with great care to avoid harsh results. In general, Florida Circuit Courts sit in equity over trust and will disputes and are thus empowered to look to the intent of the settlor of a trust or testator of a will when deciding the rights of litigants.  However, Florida’s 1st District Court of Appeal recently authored an opinion which indicates that, in situations regarding powers of appointment, strict compliance with the written instrument is absolutely necessary, regardless of the apparent intent of the testator attempting to exercise the power through a provision in her will.  The case, Cessac v. Stevens, 2013 Fla. App. LEXIS 18525 (Fla. Dist. Ct. App. 1st Dist. Nov. 20, 2013), is one of only two Florida cases which speak directly to this issue. A power of appointment is, generally speaking, the authority […]

read more
Page 2 of 212

We can make a difference.
Call now for a complimentary consultation.
Toll Free 1-800-249-8125

Phone: (954) 764-7273
Fax: (954) 764-7274

Suntrust Center
515 East Las Olas Blvd, Suite 1050
Fort Lauderdale, FL 33301